Links Links Links

Out of all the main social media channels the only one which really left me confused was Snapchat, the service that deletes the message 10 seconds after its been read. I didn’t buy the argument that its usage was a response to governmental or parental surveillance. The former because I don’t think teenagers worry about the government, even if they should, and the latter because its obscure enough to still fly under most parental radars and I think teens know that. Danah Boyd, who has recently published “It’s complicated” about how teens use social media (which is brilliant and needs to be widely read), explains the phenomena. It turns out that the attraction is one of scarcity in a world of persistence and abundance. The Snapchat message is cherished beyond others directly because of its ephemerality. In a world of message saturation, the one that disappears is consumed with the recipient’s full attention, even if that means waiting for a suitable moment.

Why Snapchat is valuable

 

Here’s a solid and thorough analysis that overturns a few of the ‘truths’ that are widely accepted by large portions of the publisher, agency and advertiser universes. If you work in any of those industries this should go straight into your reading list.

A widespread assumption is that the more content is liked or shared, the more engaging it must be, the more willing people are to devote their attention to it. However, the data doesn’t back that up. We looked at 10,000 socially-shared articles and found that there is no relationship whatsoever between the amount a piece of content is shared and the amount of attention an average reader will give that content.

What you think you know about the web is wrong

 

This is a fascinating read about Camden New Jersey, an American city which has had an interesting recent history. Camden is an economically depressed and dangerous place. In 2011 in response to huge reductions in their state subsidies they made 168 police officers redundant from a force of 368. It was pretty lawless before that happened, it got a lot worse afterwards. The move was calculated to break the union hold over the police department which had seen a buildup of unacceptable largesse which had been pushed through in light of the the acknowledged danger of the job. It was a successful gambit, and now the police are structured the way the Governor wants they have seen a resurgence of support from the state coffers and are taking control back almost street by street (it seems it was that bad). Camden is where the white suburbanite drug users from Philadelphia buy their heroin, with a daily and steady stream of buyers arriving to keep the Camden drug market vibrant. Its incidental to the main narrative but I found this small, but perverse, anecdote very interesting…

In fact, when Camden made the papers a few years back after a batch of Fentanyl-laced heroin caused a series of fatalities here, it attracted dope fiends from hundreds of miles away. “People were like, ‘Wow, I’ve gotta try that,'” says Adrian, a recovering addict from nearby Logan Township who used to come in from the suburbs to score every day and is now here to visit a nearby methadone clinic. “Yeah,” says her friend Adam, another suburban white methadone commuter. “If someone dies at a dope set, that’s where you want to get your dope.

Rolling Stone

 

Recently Microsoft used their reserved right to read their users’ Hotmail messages to get to the bottom of a criminal software leak. It was an action that was enabled by their terms of service, but did not need a warrant or the involvement of police or the legal profession. They caught a great deal of flak for it, largely because it would likely have been possible to gain the same access by following due process. They have recently announced that in similar circumstances in the future they will indeed resolve the issue through the police. Rather sadly, as the quote below makes plain, this really should not be a ‘concession’. The days of boilerplate terms of service that dismiss obvious standard behaviours needs to end.

Smith asks a seemingly rhetorical question: “What is the best way to strike the balance in other circumstances that involve, on the one hand, consumer privacy interests, and on the other hand, protecting people and the security of Internet services they use?” That is indeed a fascinating question, but in the specific case of Hotmail, I feel like it has a pretty obvious answer: change your terms of service so that you promise not to read your customers’ email without a court order. Then, if you think there’s a situation that warrants invading your customers’ privacy, get a court order. This is just basic rule-of-law stuff, and it’s the kind of thing you’d hope Microsoft’s General Counsel would find obvious.

Rule of law

 

Paul Graham is one of the co-founders of Y-Combinator one of silicon valley’s most prominent tech accelerators. In this interview he covers a lot of ground in a fairly short amount of time. He also makes one observation which backs up the thought that the new swathe of entrepreneurs are in fact the new labour class, not the management or owner class that perhaps they imagine themselves to be, or at least that they are working to achieve. Tales of founders being replaced at the whim of VC’s have never sat well with me. This quote from Graham, regarding the qualities they look for in a startup/idea certainly sounds like the words of an employer not an investor assessing a specific business.

Mostly, we look at the people. If they seem determined, flexible, and energetic, and their ideas are not just flamingly terrible, then we’ll fund them. We thought Airbnb was a bad idea.

Paul Graham interview

Advertisements


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s